Tag Archives: colombo family

12.1n009.colombo--300x300

Mafia’s Romeo rubout

It was a mob hit — over a woman.

Veteran wiseguy Francis “BF” Guerra yesterday was accused of helping carry out the point-blank 1992 execution of a man who was dating the ex-wife of a senior Colombo crime-family gangster.

Alphonse “Allie Boy” Persico — behind bars at the time — was angry about his ex-wife’s relationship, and her new boyfriend, Michael Devine, was warned to cut off the romance.

“But Michael Devine didn’t listen to that message,” Assistant US Attorney Allon Lifshitz said in opening statements at Guerra’s murder trial in Brooklyn federal court. “Michael Devine was murdered to send a message.”

He was shot four times in the head, once in the chest, and twice in the groin. Message sent, prosecutors said.

Guerra is also charged in a second hit during the crime family’s factional wars, and with several extortion counts.

Source: nypost.com

gioeli

‘Blessed’ Colombo crime boss Tommy Shots Gioeli says God was on his side in jury room

 

HE SAYS he’s going to hell for whacking a former nun, but Colombo crime boss Thomas Gioeli is still on speaking terms with God.

In his first public statement since a Brooklyn jury acquitted him of six gangland murders last week, Tommy Shots blogged from prison that he owes the stunning verdict to divine intervention. He gave no credit to his defense team.

Of course, the jury knew Gioeli was a religious wiseguy — mob rat Dino Calabro testified that Gioeli passed the order to kill former underboss William (Wild Bill) Cutolo in the rosary garden of a Long Island church.

“I am so loved and blessed by our Heavenly Father that if I was to pass in the night it would be as the richest man,” Gioeli stated in an email from the Metropolitan Detention Center, where he is still being held without bail because the jury convicted him of racketeering.

“So when, through God’s grace, my jury said not guilty five times and not proven 28 times at the conclusion of my recent federal trial for RICO and multiple murders, I was humbled, as well as reminded, just how much our God, our Heavenly Father, loves me and all of us,” he said, referring to his wife and four daughters.

Federal prosecutors were poised to present evidence to the jury that Gioeli had confessed to Calabro he was “going to hell” for the death of ex- nun Veronica Zuraw, fatally wounded by a stray bullet during a gangland rubout in Brooklyn.

William Cutolo Jr. said he is still outraged by the jury’s failure to convict on the substantial evidence that Gioeli and co-defendant Dino Saracino killed his father in 1997.

 

Source: nydailynews.com

Mafioso

Too tough to fuggedabout: Notable Mafia nicknames

Former New England Mafia boss Luigi “Baby Shacks” Manocchio was sentenced Friday to 5 1/2 years in prison for his role in the shakedown of Providence, R.I., strip clubs. AP takes a look at some of the more notable nicknames associated with the mob and tries to shed light on their sometimes murky origins:

– Vincent “Vinny Gorgeous” Basciano, former acting boss of the Bonanno crime family, owned a beauty salon in the Bronx called “Hello Gorgeous” and was known for being obsessed with his personal appearance; serving life on racketeering and murder charges.

-Anthony “Tony Bagels” Cavezza, an accused Gambino family mobster known for his affection for New York bagels. He was indicted in Jan. 2011 as part of a sweep in New York, New Jersey and Rhode Island and awaits trial on charges including running an illegal gambling business scheduled later this month; has pleaded not guilty.

-Anthony “Tony Ducks” Corallo, a New York City mobster and boss of the Lucchese crime family, earned his nickname because of his ability to duck subpoenas and convictions during his long criminal career. Died in a prison hospital in 2000.

-Carmen “The Cheeseman” DiNunzio, former underboss of the New England mob, got his nickname because he was the portly owner of a cheese shop in Boston’s North End; now serving a 6-year prison sentence for bribing an undercover FBI agent posing as a state official to try to win a $6 million contract on Boston’s Big Dig highway project.

-Vincent “The Chin” Gigante, headed the Genovese organized crime family, known for faking mental illness for decades to hide his position. His nickname apparently came from his mother’s pronunciation of “Cincenzo,” a variation of his name in Italian, and his childhood friends shortened that to “Chin”; died in prison in 2005 at age 77.

– Manocchio is also sometimes called “Baby Shanks.” The nickname “Baby Shacks” is said to have been given to him because he had an older relative nicknamed “Shacks,” which was bestowed because of that man’s relationships with numerous women.

-Carmine “The Snake” Persico, de-facto boss of the Colombo crime family, earned his nickname for switching sides in a mob faction battle. Persico has been serving a 139-year sentence since 1987 on racketeering charges.

-Harry “The Hunchback” Riccobene, a Philadelphia mobster. At 4-foot 11-inches, he was known as “little Harry” until a police officer dubbed him “Hunchback” for his short, bent stature. He died in prison in 2000 while serving a life sentence for murder.

-Francis “Cadillac Frank” Salemme, former boss of the New England mob, so named because he owned a bunch of auto body garages in Boston. Salemme later became a government witness. Released from prison in 2009, he is now believed to be in the witness protection program.

-Philip “Chicken Man” Testa, briefly led the Scarfo crime family in Philadelphia. Testa’s nickname is believed to have come from his involvement in a poultry business. He had a heavily pockmarked face, caused by a bad case of chicken pox, which is also thought to be one of the reasons for his nickname. Testa was killed by a bomb in a mob assassination.

 

Sources: AP, newspaper archives, FBI.

Thomas Gioeli

Reputed NYC mob boss cleared of killing officer

A reputed Mafia boss and a co-defendant were convicted Wednesday on racketeering charges. But in a blow to the government, they were acquitted of the most shocking crime in their federal case: the unsolved gangland slaying of an off-duty New York Police Department officer in 1997.

A jury delivered the mixed verdict for the defendants _ Thomas “Tommy Guns” Gioeli, the reputed former boss of the Colombo crime family, and reputed mob soldier Dino “Little Dino” Saracino _ on its fifth day of deliberations in federal court in Brooklyn.

Gioeli, 59, had been charged in a total of six murders, including that of Officer Ralph Dols, dating to the 1990s. Jurors found that he and Saracino were involved in murder plots but also concluded that prosecutors failed to prove they actually killed Dols or the others.

The two defendants smiled broadly and slapped their lawyers’ backs after the jury left the courtroom. They face up to 20 years in prison at sentencing on Sept. 14. The murder counts had carried a possible life term.

Outside court, defense attorney Adam Perlmutter said the verdict was a repudiation of the government’s star witness, admitted assassin Dino “Big Dino” Calabro.

“It’s clear (jurors) rejected the vast majority of what Dino Calabro had to say,” the lawyer said.

Prosecutors had no immediate comment.

Investigators believe Dols ran afoul of the mob by marrying the ex-wife of Joel Cacace, another Colombo boss. On the witness stand, Calabro, at the time a Colombo associate, described being recruited by Gioeli for a “piece of work” wanted by Cacace.

Gioeli misled Calabro by telling him the target was a worker at a Queens social club who was in trouble with the family, Calabro said. The witness described how he and Saracino donned baseball caps and gloves before confronting Dols as he got out of his car.

“What’s up?” the officer asked before both men opened fire and left him fatally wounded on the street, Calabro said. The killers tossed their guns in the sewer as they fled, he said.

Calabro said he only learned the victim was a police officer by reading newspaper headlines the next day.

“I was amazed,” he said. “We don’t typically kill police officers. That’s just the rule _ you don’t hurt kids and you don’t kill cops.”

Another witness, Saracino’s brother Sebastian, testified that he was ordered to get rid of a Cadillac used in the Dols rubout. The testimony drew a courtroom outburst by Saracino.

“Don’t call me your brother no more! … Stop lying, Sebby!” the defendant shouted as he was led to a holding cell while jurors took a break.

 

Source: stltoday.com

thomas_gioeli

Jury hears closing arguments in NYC mob case

NEW YORK (AP) – A federal prosecutor urged a jury on Tuesday to reject defense arguments that the government used conniving turncoat mobsters to frame a reputed Mafia boss and another defendant in the brutal slayings of six victims, including an off-duty police officer.

“The government did not choose these men- the defendants did,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Elizabeth Geddes said at the murder trial in federal court in Brooklyn. “They robbed with them and they killed with them.”

In their summations, attorneys for Thomas “Tommy Guns” Gioeli, the alleged former boss of the Colombo crime family, and reputed mob soldier Dino “Little Dino” Saracino sought to convince the jury that key government witnesses- one an admitted hit man, another Saracino’s brother- had lied on the witness stand in a bid for leniency.

Outside the turncoats’ testimony, prosecutors offered no evidence proving that Gioeli ordered any of the killings, defense attorney Adam Perlmutter said Tuesday.

Gioeli, 59, “has been targeted relentlessly because he knows people the government doesn’t like,” Perlmutter said.

Jurors have heard one of the cooperators, Dino “Big Dino” Calabro, give dramatic testimony about the previously unsolved killing in 1997 of Officer Ralph Dols.

Investigators believe Dols ran afoul of the mob by marrying the ex-wife of Joel Cacace, another Colombo boss. Calabro, at the time a Colombo associate, described being recruited by Gioeli for a “piece of work” wanted by Cacace.

Gioeli misled Calabro by telling him the target was a worker at a Queens social club who was in trouble with the family, Calabro said. The witness described how he and Saracino donned baseball caps and gloves before confronting Dols as he got out of his car.

“What’s up?” the officer asked before both men opened fire and left him fatally wounded on the street, Calabro said. The killers tossed their guns in the sewer as they fled, he said.

Calabro claimed he only learned the victim was a police officer by reading newspaper headlines the next day.

“I was amazed,” he said. “We don’t typically kill police officers. That’s just the rule- you don’t hurt kids and you don’t kill cops.”

Another witness, Saracino’s brother Sebastian, testified that he was ordered to get rid of a Cadillac used in the Dols rubout. The testimony drew a courtroom outburst by Saracino.

“Don’t call me your brother no more! … Stop lying, Sebby!” the defendant shouted as he was being led to a holding cell while jurors took a break.

The jury could begin deliberating later Tuesday.

 

Source: ktar.com

Thomas Gioeli

Mobster’s attorney turns to Psalms for final remarks during murder trial, calls witnesses ‘rats’

It’s a Mafia trial that sounds more like a scholarly lecture at a theological seminary.

The defense attorney for Colombo crime family street boss Thomas “Tommy Shots” Gioeli adopted a religious tone today in his final remarks to the jury, quoting Biblical and Talmudic passages with the authority of a religious scholar.

“Deliver me not over unto the will of mine enemies,” attorney Adam Perlmutter intoned, quoting Psalm 27.

“For false witnesses are risen up against me,” the attorney continued.

Those “false witnesses” are former mobsters who once were members of the Colombo crime family, who over the past six weeks delivered damning testimony at Gioeli’s trial implicating him in six brutal and carefully-planned Mafia murders.

Perlmutter implored the Brooklyn federal court jury to be careful in weighing the source of the evidence amassed against Gioeli.

“You must evaluate the credibility of these witnesses to decide if you can believe them,” the attorney said.

That’s when the spiritual tone evaporated in the silent courtroom, as Perlmutter described the ex-mobsters who testified against Gioeli as government witnesses, calling them “untrustworthy, unreliable, desperate individuals.

“You know what else they are? Rats!” Perlmutter said of the FBI informants.

Furthermore, even if Gioeli admittedly was at the scene at one of the premeditated mob hits, the attorney argued, that doesn’t mean that he played a role in the killing.

“Simply because he was there, he is not guilty of that murder,” Perlmutter said.

The defense, however, skirted past several other relevant details that fall within the thematic outlines of a religious parable.

For example, the attorney has not mentioned the testimony from a close associate that Gioeli once plotted a ranking gangster’s murder in the same Long Island church garden where he regularly prayed.

Colombo underboss William “Wild Bill” Cutolo was eventually shot to death and buried in a Long Island field, prosecutors say.

There has also been no mention of the allegation that Gioeli once told a colleague that he believed he’s destined for hell, because of the role he played in the 1982 murder of a former Catholic nun.

Gioeli and another mobster fatally shot Veronica Zuraw with a stray shotgun blast in Brooklyn that was intended for two other mob associates, prosecutors say.

He was not charged with the former nun’s murder, but is currently on trial for a total of six mob hits.

 

Source: nypost.com

gioeli

Tommy ‘Shots’ Gioeli trial: Testimony from mob rat cousin bites defense

Thomas McLaughlin testifies that Gioeli approved killers for 1991 hit on Frank ‘Chestnut’ Marasa.

Tommy Shots’ decision to call his cousin as a witness in his murder and racketeering trial backfired Monday.

Colombo crime boss Thomas Gioeli had hoped mob turncoat Thomas McLaughlin’s testimony would clear him of any role in the 1991 rubout of Frank (Chestnut) Marasa in Brooklyn. Instead it did the opposite.

McLaughlin testified that Gioeli had approved the killers on the hit team.

After Marasa was gunned down, McLaughlin said he drove shooter Dino Calabro to meet his cousin at the Cropsey Diner.

McLaughlin also testified that he was reprimanded by Gioeli for blabbing to people about “taking care of” Marasa.

Defense lawyer Adam Perlmutter looked stunned as McLaughlin unloaded on the stand and asked the turncoat if he told these details to investigators.

“I don’t recall if I did say it before, or if I didn’t,” McLaughlin sneered.

McLaughlin wore a wire for the feds, secretly recording conversations with multiple Colombo gangsters. But federal prosecutors decided not to call McLaughlin during the Gioeli trial.

The latest family betrayal in the trial — last week co-defendant Dino Saracino was implicated by his brother in multiple murders — triggered a volley of retorts in the courtroom.

With the jury present, Gioeli snapped, “Stop drinking,” to McLaughlin.

That prompted McLaughlin to reply, “Richie says hello,” apparently a reference to slain crew member Richard Greaves, whom Gioeli and Saracino are charged with murdering.

“How’s Joey Caves?” Gioeli shot back, referring to another turncoat witness, Joseph Competiello.

Then Gioeli’s daughter got in the act, shouting at McLaughlin from the gallery section.

Brooklyn Federal Judge Brian Cogan threatened to eject the next spectator who yelled at a witness.

Earlier, Cogan had threatened to boot Gioeli if he didn’t stay silent.

After getting sandbagged by McLaughlin, defense lawyers decided against calling their dozen character witnesses.

Closing arguments are scheduled to begin Wednesday, with Gioeli charged with six murders and Saracino charged with three.

 

Source: nydailynews.com